The Sorcerer’s Receptionist Volume 1 Review

Nanalie lives in a world of magic and after visiting her father’s workplace as a young girl she resolved to become one of the “receptionist ladies” at Harre, an organization that handles requests of a magical nature. To work there however, Nanalie will need to be a skilled magic user herself so it’s off to […] The post The Sorcerer’s Receptionist Volume 1 Review appeared first on TheOASG.

The Sorcerer’s Receptionist Volume 1 Review
Nanalie lives in a world of magic and after visiting her father’s workplace as a young girl she resolved to become one of the “receptionist ladies” at Harre, an organization that handles requests of a magical nature. To work there however, Nanalie will need to be a skilled magic user herself so it’s off to school to study hard and make lifetime friends and rivals. The Sorcerer’s Receptionist’s story felt a bit uneven and sloppy in terms of pacing, and I’m not simply referring to how this first volume cuts off very abruptly. To become a magic user, Nanalie has to go through six years of magic school and the story clips through this in only about half a volume in a rather awkward manner. Not every magic school story has to be like Harry Potter and spend a lot of time on each and every year, but I still felt how Mako flitted from event to event, with months or even years passing in-between, made for a jarring reading experience and that there must have been a more graceful way to establish Nanalie’s magical prowess and meet the supporting cast at the same time. After she graduates, it certainly feels a little weird that Nanalie, who is at the top of her class, ends up getting her dream job as an entry-level receptionist when her friends with similar (but lower) grades go after more prestigious jobs. At first I wondered if this was commentary on how so many entry-level jobs require a ridiculous amount of experience and skills, something that’s a common complaint amongst young adults in the US, but that wasn’t the case at all; Mako simply has Nanalie follow her childhood dreams without considering how her dreams might change or evolve over six plus years. It would be one thing if Nanalie wanted to work at Harre in general and saw her entry-level role as a step, not a final destination, and not to be dismissive of administrative staff (I’ve been a receptionist myself) but the whole set-up just felt like a weird strain of sexism when I also thought about everything I’ve heard about female employment/prospects in Japan. While Maro’s cover art is rather cute, the inner art is rather lacking (and there’s not much of it since this volume is split into rather large chapters). Her inner illustrations fall into some familiar issues, mainly that these drawings have rather boring composition and no attempt made at a background. They’re mostly just boring shots of the characters that are lacking in details (like one illustration showing part of Nanalie’s magical examinations that is missing some important aspects from the moment it’s depicting). It’s been rather disappointing lately to read so many light novels with illustrations which feel as if they are a perfunctory, contractually-obligated image instead of something thoughtful that contributes to and enhances the story. All of these things being said, I also did find myself swearing at the book when the ending cut off and quickly looking up to see how long the series was and if the next book was already out. For me The Sorcerer’s Receptionist was a casual read, with more flaws that stood out than strengths, but that and the will-they-won’t-they central relationship still struck my brain in the same way a regency romance can keep me, the unromantic, following along intently. It’s a dime store novel, it’s a quick hit but an effective one for the right fans. The series is only three volumes long (mysteriously J-Novel Club lists the second volume as an isekai which would be a huge twist if correct) and I can see myself settling in over a long weekend and finishing up the series, although I’m not sure for how long I would remember the series later. The post The Sorcerer’s Receptionist Volume 1 Review appeared first on TheOASG.